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tax cuts and the expiration possibilities, obama and the democrats like to use the $250,000 figure. that is insane they will not raise taxes on the middle class. republicans -- that is saying they will not raising region be raising taxes on the middle class. republicans may find it expedient to allow them to expire so they can point fingers at the democrats during an election year. is it possible you may want to accept the $250,000 level rather than risk that all the tax cuts would expire? >> our opposition has always been pretty firm, and that we support an extension of all the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. we believe in an economy as weak as the one we are living in right now that raising taxes on any individuals, and certainly on individuals that spend significant amounts of money as well as businesses that are successful and in a greater position to hire and expand output, we believe that is not something that should be done. when it gets into which ones we would or would not accept, i am not going to sit here and negotiate with myself and public saying we will open the bidding at a
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
recent recession that demonstrates the u.s. is very strong in its reaction to the cheonan incident. they joined at the very beginning in the rescue operations, and also, [unintelligible] -- the were in strong support of the u.s. administration. this is the largest area ever conducted in the caribbean peninsula. -- kirby and peninsula. i might say that this is the reincarnation of the incident that happened between 1977 and 1993. it was a deterrent to north korean leadership and rain that in north korean policies -- north korean policies. one side effect of this is china's reaction. when we conducted this exercise in the wake of the cheonan sinking, the chinese reaction was unusually harsh. i think it has awakened at the international community. it is central in the war, as reflected in the sense of china. china had some objection to this joint exercise. for example, july 15 -- "we formally oppose any foreign militaries placed in the yellow city, undermining china's security." and second also, this was a joint week emphasized by a high- ranking military -- this was a jointly emphasi
is by former u.s. attorney general michael mukasey. again, president obama will have an announcement this afternoon in the white house rose garden. we will have coverage at 1:30 p.m. eastern. until then, an author who has written a book critical of the obama administration. ng this friday, september 17, david limbaugh returns. his latest book is called "crimes against liberty: an indictment of president barack obama." as with the start -- start our discussion, for an author, had a new spirit of the lettuce nonfiction best-seller list. "the new york times" as the book and a number one spot, the second week on the list. "wall street journal" nonfiction, number two. and the combined list of fiction and nonfiction books at "usa today" #28, moving up and not -- #30. why is is selling so well? guest: i think it is resonating. people in america are very scared about what is going on about the bankrupting spending the federal government is doing and the destruction of our liberties and the assaults of individual liberties and assaults on the states, the war against the state, how president o
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
deserved for being a phenomenal leader and the u.s. congress for three decades, who's sitting right here in the front row. and i've just got to say how much all of it congressman phil crane has done for the cause. [applause] [alause] i've got to say one of the really early thrilled by head when i was enacted in politics as a young guy with cp had a guest there wasa young republican national convention in new orleans where i'm from and standing on a riverboat going down the river and congressman crane was there and was so approachable and he will remember it come up and i remember it to this day comes thathey're talking to me for the longest time, drinking a beer as if he had nothing better to do than talk to this college kid. and again, thank you, congressman crane. [applause] also one other shout out. my fellow yaf word member at georgetown university in the mid-80's and fellow fresan dorm for who we were in the same freshman dorm for, fellow iter, he is fed by a heck of a lot more people across this country than i did and is done great things to the conservative cause. my friend tried
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
you so much for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the house of representatives live next. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. today the house is working hard to get out of here, we do not know the schedule will change, but we for sure know that one of the bills on their agenda today is a discussion about compensation for 9/11 first responders who have developed health problems. thank you for being with us. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] periods [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend scott moore, doctorial student, germany. the chaplain: god of the nations, you have chosen many in various ways to show your pre
to certain entities that will use the funds to make loans to consumers to implement energy efficient measures involving structural improvements and investments in cost effective commercial off-the-shelf technologies to improve home energy use. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. mr. arcuri: thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from nebraska rise? >> request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. fortenberry: mr. speaker, he was called a young man of integrity and respect, a great marine who loved the marine corps, a loving husband and father. this is how the late staff sergeant michael a. bach was remembered by those who knew him. he was conducting operations in the hellman province in afghanistan when his patrol came under fire and died from those injuries on august 13. he had served four deployments in beeth iraq and afghanistan and was awarded the purple heart, navy and marine corps achie
of medical technology changes over that period of time. you have diseases like pneumonia that used to kill people and now you take a few pills. we have had all these changes and that has not changed the fact that health care -- when we are wealthier, we want to consume more health care. we want to stay healthier. we're willing to pay for it and replace body parts. when you get old, you are replacing these body parts. we have not been able to control that because no one is paying for it. if individuals were paying for it, it might look different. with 60 years of consistent growth, i think we are projecting that time and saying magic will not happen in the next 60 years. we would say the variances small parade you are absolutely right that we do not know what will happen in the future. i think it is largely about incentives. if we are structuring the incentives, we are not making the providers -- we need to take medicare advantage and give people premium support and make medicare all medicare advantage and go out and let them bid to get the customers instead of us telling them what we will
is crossing the table. and they are able -- their business model is basically to use the power of their monopoly or duopoly position to extract more and more revenue from folks who are dependent on this service that is essential for the transaction -- the sale of gas, the sale of grocery -- to occur. and that business model that i think we have to reward is the hard work and good service and high quality and a fair price. and our merchants, individual merchants, have no capacity to protect themselves on the cost of each transaction. and when you have electronic transactions, they are pretty simple to do. there is an expense involved. the price as charged has to be fair. and unless you have a cop on the beat -- in this case, the federal reserve writing regulations to make certain the banks don't overreach so the charges are reasonable and proportionate -- you will see merchants getting hammered with because they can't control. it eats into their profits and their viability. this i think is overdue. other countries have a much lower cost per transaction, and their economies do fi
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11